Saturday, July 11, 2015

Language//Rights


photo by logan campbell



My son runs L drills - d
                                        o
                                        w
                                        n,
                                            o u t,   (turn)
                                                       (hands up)
                                                        THWAP
it's all coordination & timing,
when done right - the ball is there, his hands
ready & --- he glistens / shimmers,
his long hair hangs in strands
still slick with amniotic fluid

How many times has he been too slow,
took a ball to the face //  gut,
doubled over backward from a tackle // to early,
until he gets it,
                          blood and calouses,
pulled muscles and deep aches
form a new testament, truth:

We are what we practice,

& we practice dismantling - call it understanding,
as we turn the screwdriver, lay another face
plate to the side, a thin wire, a nut - each part
greater than the sum of the whole; race,
gender, religeon - multiplication as a means
to division - & no one remembers how

to put it back together again,
or if we should - or build something new,
a pale shadow of what once was - in our own image,
complete with property lines & street names
like Elm, Pine View, Oak Branch,
as epitaphs to trees that gave their life,

It's no wonder our kids are joining ISIS,
in record numbers - they'll follow anyone
that believes
           
                    Something     //       Anything

& actually lives it,
                               Practice

will be over soon,
all the kids are huddling, howling
in unison, chanting in rhythm

Tribal

as our nature - unified
as only the divisiveness
                   of our constructs
                                                        allows.



49 comments:

  1. We have to be sure that our children practice what is important.
    I think we need to pay attention to just what it is that thy DO practice.

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  2. There's a lot of truth here--understanding is dismantling in many ways--the way some do it--others may use analysis in a constructive way--I think part of the problem though is that people want everything to be simpler than it is. You are right, they do not want hypocrisy--but they also have an image that everything can be resolved with simplicity and honestly, life is pretty complex! Earlier ages were too, but people sort of gloss over all of that. Thanks for super interesting (and as always compelling) poem. k.

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  3. Oh you have nailed it - our kids joining ISIS because they need something - anything - to believe in. Our society's materialism leaves a void where the soul is thirsting for something money cant buy. Loved this one.

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  4. a misguided society breaks down just as a society without higher ideals...it's rather difficult to leave everything and follow for a greater cause and become 'fishers of men'...practice should be the watchword and always for all that is beneficial to all....a wonderful poem as always...

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  5. I like what you did with the title, sort of turning it into different things, like maybe "Languish Rights/Writes." Plus, you have the parallel lines in the title and then the perpendicular lines (L) in the opening line. So there's some sort of statement about types of directionality and points of connection ... the various ways in which they are achieved, by lots of different people.

    "L drills" minus "d" = perpendicular "reals" ... perfect angles, 90-degree angles ... there something cool in this; I can feel it ... about what's real and what's not; about what touches and what doesn't

    de-own ... you can't own something, or someone, unless you let them go, turn them out, see what happens when you're gone

    We're all babies, connected to our mothers by the umbilical co(o)rd(ination) --- in relationships, in life, in how we use our talents. Maybe some are a fraction of an inch further down the birth canal, but what does that really matter?

    I love the way you expressed the giving birth process:
    "(turn)
    (hands up)
    THWAP"

    And then that next part, about the doctor catching him, the "ball" ... but then here: "& we practice dismantling" ... What if this is an abortion? He's cutting the baby into pieces and placing them on the tray.

    I feel sick. So much brokenness and discarding of what the parent doesn't want or can't handle. Isn't ready for. And then the future houses, neighborhoods, kids ... just pretending like it never happened. But nature is always there. The tribal impulse, the heartbeat of all that's instinctive and naked and raw. It's always there. No matter how hard you try to destroy it or chop it up and disregard it's living, breathing body/pulse/heart/soul. Things will live if they are meant to live, no matter who tries to break them apart or rip off their limbs (or nuts, as it were).

    "The amniotic we" is a really interesting and unique phrase. I like that.

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  6. This is so true. There is something we are searching for... and maybe filling it with something is what makes the kid searching for ISIS or something else as strong... Maybe that's the task is to find those things.

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  7. Isn't belief just a form of failure, a silent acknowledgement that our mind is incapable of grasping totality and that we can feed only on fractions? When we choose one path and stick to it aren't we just forsaking all other paths and all that those alternate perspectives of reality have to offer? In the name of consistency, security and peace we're settling for spiritual mediocrity, no? Opposing forces ultimately balance each others' existence. Then why fear our enemies? Yes, this unconditional freedom of thought comes with its risks but pushing boundaries is always risky! Freedom will always be the best bet, for us, our kids and everything else :)

    Your work is great! It's beautiful and intense at the same time. Thanks for sharing it :)

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    1. Yes, in some ways it is. Realizing we are incapable. Would that be failure - or knowledge/wisdom. I guess we have to ask where does freedom end? Does it end where another's begins? Because my freedom or thoughts on freedom may be different from yours, or the next persons. So freedom has to have conditions, otherwise it become wanton chaos.

      I dont disagree with you on settling for spiritual mediocrity. I am def not afraid of what is different and I have studied several paths through my years and I am def not above studying others.

      Who defines our enemies? Is it the government? our belief system? our family? or do we? And why? I think why is an important question. We have to understand why.

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    2. Exactly! I don't see how we are incapable. I think we set those boundaries because we're scared of what might happen if we push beyond them. We make ourselves comfortable in the trap our senses lay out for us and refuse to look for what lies beneath the obvious. If we can move past that we would find ourselves in sync with everything else and realize that not only my fellow being but even the next galaxy and its stars have the same goal as i do! (Well, I'm drifting here towards mysticism...so i'll end my rant here :P )

      In my short and stupid life i have come to a place where i find myself equidistant from every philosophy of life and being that i have come across. I tried and adopted and found insufficient every one of them. Hopefully, somewhere, somehow i'll find something that suits my psyche, or not. As Socrates put it, "I know one thing: that I know nothing" :)

      I think "why" is the proverbial rabbit hole that remains ever unanswered but on the surface of it, i think our definitions are based on a mix of all these things you mentioned. And now with the internet, information and points of view that were previously hidden from us can be accessed. I have found that if only we listen patiently every perspective can be convincing. With more and more people doing that there won't be enemies, may be? "I have a dream..." :)

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    3. Well if I was to dream, that would not be a bad one to have. I so agree with being unable to see beyond the obvious. Sadly, we are far to lazy to see beyond, and merely judge by what we can skim off the surface. Listening, is a dying skill. As we "listen" we are already formulating our arguments, thinking of the next witty thing to say, or formulating out grocery list. Ha.

      I have to run, but let me give this more thought. Really enjoying the conversation. Will stop back over at your place as well to see if you added a thought there.

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    4. I think that's just our nature right now. We may yet involve further :)
      I read somewhere that there is a massive tide of stimuli constantly passing through and that our senses only tune into a tiny fraction of it because that is all our brain is capable of. If that's true, it's not surprising that we pay attention to an even smaller fraction.

      When you stop by, you'll find a rather elaborate response waiting for you. This conversation is tingling my mind and i'm unable to hold back :D

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    5. Sorry, "evolve" not "involve"!

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  8. Beautifully expressed...the broken parts, the trees that died... there are so many layers and nuances here, emerging anew at each reading of your poem.

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  9. These days children are exposed to so many gadgets but the real things only parents can teach.

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    1. I would not argue with you there - if parents accepted that responsibility.

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  10. Your poem tackles a lot of complex things--the nature of belief, of the tribe, of ourselves and what we need, what we think we need, what we want, what we get...(and does an excellent job--the metaphor of child and practice especially apt) but my personal belief is that we have pushed ourselves as a species as far as we are able to go(at least for now) so far, indeed, that we have come full circle; we've dismantled everything, and can't put it back together so it will work, and are left with the chaos of only primal--even brutal--forces. There is too much, and too little in our lives, and we starve in the midst of a plenty we have learned to ignore. A dark imagination here, but not an inaccurate one, I fear.

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    1. That is an interesting thoguht as well Hedge. It does seem we have looped back around to our base desires and need to fufil those. Like the development of a kid that never got beyond fingering their own anus. Not meaning to be gross there, but real. Primal is a good word for it.

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  11. Freedom of thought - belonging...yes, it is what all minds seek - particularly young minds who are left aching for role models and purpose..i enjoyed how this expanded from an intimate family moment into the bigger 'world' - every child/man/woman who dies is somebody's son or daughter

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  12. Sadly our leaders and politicians will not see Isis as a failure on their part to provide and nurture their own or to inspire their people to achieve better. Most nations have developed a desire for greed and need for more than others which is clearly counterproductive.

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  13. We are what we practice - that line resonates with me ~ As a parent, I believe in setting a strong example for the children & that includes telling them firmly what is good and what is not ~ Some parents nowadays are too vague, condoning & meek in setting down lines & words ~

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    1. I do not disagree with you at all. I think this is the rubber band theory. Parents became so strict, we said we will not be like out parents and so now our neglect is misinterpretted as condoning everything. I have yet to meet anyone that condones everything, no matter how liberal. Because that is not really freedom, that is chaos. Because our freedoms will impinge upon the freedoms of others.

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  14. Loved this poem. Such a wise statement.. indeed we are what we practice.. and we should always make sure our children are on the right path. Beautifully penned!

    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

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  15. a complex piece and some really deep thoughts as well
    i often think if we teach our kids how to read a map they will be able to find their way even when the streets are torn apart - even with cul de sacs and detours and in heavy traffic chaos or on long road parts without a single sign - they need a reason though why to make the effort to weigh and check and double-check and talk through things - otherwise they will get lost on the way and are open for all kinds of strange or dangerous organizations

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  16. It is shocking how labeling is killing individuality, trying to force us all into the same box, separate and removed from what is real. By distraction. Abolishment. Words??? Not being allowed to believe unless we are told to believe it. Shocking!

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  17. You have touched on some real issues. I worry about the next 7 generations..what will remain when all is lost to chaos..the road is harder to travel these days as there seems to be no "true" direction. We live in a material world..the need to have, but I wonder what happens to the ability to feel and how does society cope with issues. Will the tribes separate and turn on each other? Perhaps, the ancient ones had the right idea..bury the arrow and form a stronger alignment so the future will have hope. I dream of a better world, but I wonder who will lead the way?

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  18. It's true that people are what they practice. I think parents can lead by example. Still it's a tough job as kids are influenced by so many factors that can steer them the wrong way. But loving parents can definitely make a difference to raise their children right. Your poem has a creative & unique format as well.

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  19. Ouch! I loved the opening images of ball-playing and learning! The leap to joining in religious terrorism is one that startled me from feeling into thinking--We do build entire cities in the amniotic fluid, but we also encourage/nurture the growth of whole beings. This child is surely not in danger of the rejected love that makes him seek elsewhere for completion? What an amazing poem! Thank you.

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  20. practise is so important in amassing fine tuning good qualities; the accumulation and remembrance of essentials

    Have a good Sunday X; thanks for dropping in at my Sunday Lime today

    much love...

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  21. i can't help but agree with you

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  22. I think you're actually talking about Isis, the "goddess of children" and the "patroness of nature and magic." It's also a clever way to say "Eye Sis."

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  23. X - you got me at the "amniotic fluid." This has great depth and you hold "it, yourself, me, the world (?) together well. Thanks for visiting my new blog.

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  24. 'multiplication as a means to division' - the paradox where more is not more, but may dismantle, merely a 'pale shadow of what was'. ISIS is just one example of modern scaffolding, trying to lure appreciation of new life designs. A fascinating positioning of words and play on modern ideas - or the hollowness of them.

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  25. This reminds me of the 1970s when I was in high school and so many people were joining cults....trying to understand what attracted them. I think you nailed it...to believe in something, anything where someone practices what they preach. Superb X.

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  26. An intense, thought-provoking piece, that is really well written.

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  27. What we practice we become.
    "in the amniotic we build whole cities"

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  28. You bring this full circle beautifully, seamlessly. and you make me feel it.

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  29. Terrific poem on an important subject. I like the way you explore insights instead of trying to provide answers. I would beg this one for my 'I Wish I'd Written This' column, except that my readers will already have seen it via the Pantry.

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  30. 1984 is way past us ... or is it? I believe that Big Brother is still watching very much so ...

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  31. There are so many sides to this, x. Love it. I will enjoy spending time re-reading and cogitating all the different aspects. Well done. I especially liked the bit about the trees! It's no wonder too that ISIS is getting support from our young people when the world is in such chaos. We have to pray that we provide sufficient positive grounding for them to be able to judge for themselves.

    July 13, 2015 at 2:19 AM

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  32. Wow...this is deep, thought-provoking and very intense.
    I will still be pondering this before I fall asleep tonight...what we practice, we become...could be an amazing thing...or terrifying...

    An absolutely superb post, "X"...thanks!

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  33. Very thought provoking, something I agree with, and hope more see the remedy.

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  34. his long hair hangs in strands
    still slick with amniotic fluid

    Love love these lines wish I had written the myself

    In the beginning I thought of my athletic struggles. I have Disassociative Disorder so I am terribly uncoordinated and as a kid I was monstrously strong (didn't feel pain so pushed my muscles to the max) which is not a good combination and so I was never allowed to play sport with the other kids. I hated athletics but as an adult I am very into training because I decided to work with that weakness, to reach out to my body so to speak. I feel pain now which is a good and bad thing.

    It's no wonder our kids are joining ISIS,
    in record numbers - they'll follow anyone
    that believes

    Something // Anything

    & actually lives it,

    Very powerful and a lot to think about and so true. My best friend from high school joined a religious cult and I have a difficult time talking to her now, the change seems to have come from no where she wasn't even religious before

    mindlovemisery

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  35. Most poetry can be read on several levels. ... this is one like that. !! Thought provoking poem.

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  36. I like the poem within the poem... "in the amniotic, we build whole cities." How interesting!

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    1. Its a little trick I have been playing with,
      that and vertical spacing, and the capital letters.
      Mesages in messages in messages, you know.

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    2. ... interesting response, X ... cuz i do exactly the opposite ... like 2 disappear when sharing my writing ... like 2 be small & smaller ... so i resort 2 small caption & numbers & symbols ... & sumtmesievenjustdon'tputspaces ... cuz 1 mustn't b 2 loud in this world ... how else can we listen 2 them friends ... meaning everybody that crosses our path, hmmm? Love, cat.

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  37. I am fascinated by the references to football, childbirth, electrical work. A lot going on here.

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  38. You sir have tackled 3 elements belief, nature, & ourselves.

    Have we humans forgotten who we are? Why do we need to distract ourselves of technological gadgets?

    Nature herself is pleading for comfort and keeping this planet earth alive.

    Excellent poem my friend.

    Hope you stop by and check out my last 2 poems I posted. I know you'll like. :)

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  39. Perfect one... A message conveyed!

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